Photos: MN USA State Greco Wrestling Tournament – Post-Bulletin


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Andrew Link

Photographer

Andrew has been a photojournalist with the Post Bulletin since 2015. He also dabbles in visual presentations on postbulletin.com. Before moving to Rochester, Andrew worked at the Winona Daily News for five years.




Chiefs scrap their way past Stormers for vital Super Rugby win in Cape Town – Waikato Times



SKY SPORT

The Chiefs score penalty try to defeat the Stormers in Cape Town.

A second-half penalty try has propelled the Chiefs to an important Super Rugby victory over the Stormers in Cape Town on Sunday morning (NZ time).

A week after conceding a vital automatic seven-pointer of their own in the loss to the Jaguares in Rotorua, this time, with the same referee – Mike Fraser – officiating, it was the Chiefs who were on the right side of the call, as they went on to win 15-9 at DHL Newlands.

In a dour contest featuring plenty of handling errors from both teams in what were lovely conditions, the visitors managed to score two tries to none to bag a vital four competition points.

The Chiefs celebrate their crucial penalty try which saw them defeat the Stormers in Cape Town.

CARL FOURIE/GETTY IMAGES

The Chiefs celebrate their crucial penalty try which saw them defeat the Stormers in Cape Town.

Behind 6-5, it was a powerful scrum – a feature of the Chiefs’ day – which saw them awarded the penalty try in the 65th minute, after repeated penalties against the Stormers’ pack.

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That proved the difference, as the Chiefs held on, in a game which took on extra significance because their next fixture on tour against the Sharks will see them stripped of their All Blacks because of a clash with a national camp.

The Stormers' loss was their first at home this season.

CARL FOURIE/GETTY IMAGES

The Stormers’ loss was their first at home this season.

It certainly wasn’t vintage stuff – the Chiefs spurned several options of shooting for goal early on, in favour of lineouts, but they squandered the opportunities, and it was Stormers first five-eighth Damian Willemse who opened the scoring, off the tee, after quarter of an hour.

Spending most of the time inside their own half, the Chiefs were still able to find the game’s opening try, in the 22nd minute, when Damian McKenzie cross-kicked under penalty advantage, Solomon Alaimalo gathered after an unpredictable bounce, and linked up with Anton Lienert-Brown, who ran in to finish.

The duo teamed again down the left touch just a couple of minutes later, but this time the bounce of the ball wasn’t to be the Chiefs’ way, with a chip kick over the top eventually evading the clutches of Brad Weber.

Angus Ta'avao was a key part of the Chiefs' success, with a fine scrum platform laid.

CARL FOURIE/GETTY IMAGES

Angus Ta’avao was a key part of the Chiefs’ success, with a fine scrum platform laid.

But it was the little halfback who was quickly a saviour at the other end of the park, when it looked certain the Stormers would re-take the lead as Damian de Allende sliced through, only for the hand of Weber to pop the ball free over the goal-line.

The hosts continued to camp down the Chiefs’ end till halftime, but even with McKenzie sending a lock kick out on the full, the Stormers’ poor execution saw them unable to capitalise.

After the hooter McKenzie lined up a shot at goal from 52 metres, but it fell short and the Chiefs retained a 5-3 lead after a 40 minutes neither team would care to remember.

Brad Weber, in his first start in six weeks, was able to celebrate his 50th game in style.

CARL FOURIE/GETTY IMAGES

Brad Weber, in his first start in six weeks, was able to celebrate his 50th game in style.

While both teams were willing to spread the ball, things were again punctuated by errors early in the second spell. McKenzie had the chance to extend the margin but missed his third shot from four attempts, before the Stormers were rewarded for some smart long kicking and went in front off the boot of Willemse in the 54th minute.

The Chiefs threw everything at the Stormers in response – building 15 phases in and around the hosts’ 22m – but the home side’s defence held for some time.

At the 61st minute there was a kickable penalty option but the Chiefs opted to scrum. Another penalty came and another scrum, with a try looking imminent, only for a wayward Shaun Stevenson pass. But another penalty and another scrum then saw a huge shunt from the visitors, and there came the defining penalty try.

The icing was seemingly put on the cake in the 75th minute, when Stevenson regathered his own grubber to score, but assistant referee Nick Briant found a knock on from Charlie Ngatai in the leadup, which TMO Willie Vos could not find reason to overturn.

In any case, penalty advantage was being played, and McKenzie slotted from in front for a nine-point lead, and while SP Marais responded with two minutes left, the Chiefs weren’t to surrender late, as the Stormers found no way through from deep inside their own territory.

AT A GLANCE

Chiefs 15 (Anton Lienert-Brown try, penalty try, Damian McKenzie pen) Stormers 9 (Damian Willemse 2 pen, SP Marais pen) HT: 5-3.


 – Stuff



Payton would 'absolutely' consider Adrian Peterson – NFL.com



METAIRIE, La. — New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton emphasized Saturday following the team’s rookie minicamp practice that he doesn’t have current plans to bring in a veteran running back in light of Mark Ingram’s pending four-game suspension.

Payton, however, left the door open when asked if he would consider Adrian Peterson, who recently told NFL Network’s Tom Pelissero that he would “definitely be open” to returning to the Saints.

“Absolutely,” Payton said emphatically. “This gets back to the notion that we had some type of any (sideline) argument at Minnesota (in Week 1 of the 2017 regular season), which I still say there was none. I think a ton of him.”

Peterson, who turned 33 in March, first joined New Orleans after signing a two-year, $7 million deal on April 25, 2017, just days ahead of the Saints’ selection of running back Alvin Kamara in the draft.

While Peterson arrived on the heels of a decorated career with the Vikings, it became clear during training camp that the Saints had something special in Kamara, who went on to win the NFL’s Offensive Player of the Year award.

Peterson found himself behind Ingram and Kamara on the depth chart, but the Saints believed they could make it work with the trio to start the regular season.

Nevertheless, the Saints eventually traded Peterson to the Cardinals on Oct. 10 after four regular-season games. Peterson’s stop in New Orleans resulted in 81 yards rushing on 27 carries, averaging 3 yards per attempt, and two catches for 4 yards.

He had better success in Arizona with a featured role, totaling 448 yards rushing and two touchdowns on 129 carries before a neck injury landed him on injured reserve to close out the season.


The Cardinals released Peterson on March 13, and the 12th-year pro has since spent time training and posting workout videos on social media while waiting for his next opportunity.

For now, the Saints aren’t in the market to bring in a veteran to bolster the backfield with Ingram’s looming suspension. The team appears comfortable with Kamara, Jonathan Williams, Daniel Lasco, Trey Edmunds and rookie Boston Scott.

But circumstances in New Orleans could change ahead of training camp, and Peterson apparently won’t be far from Payton’s radar should that scenario develop.

“That would the part where if all of a sudden we decided, hey, we’re going to look at additional players that are on the street,” Payton said. “And certainly his name — there’d be a few others — we have them on the board right now. Who’s available, veteran running backs, stacked on a board and graded. But, listen, he’s a tough player, warrior, and a great worker, and we have a good relationship.”



Tennis: Thiem beats Anderson for first time to reach Madrid final – Reuters


MADRID (Reuters) – Austrian Dominic Thiem beat Kevin Anderson on Saturday for the first time at the seventh attempt to reach the Madrid Open final for the second successive year.

Tennis – ATP 1000 – Madrid Open – Madrid, Spain – May 12, 2018 Austria’s Dominic Thiem celebrates winning his semi final match against South Africa’s Kevin Anderson REUTERS/Paul Hanna

The fifth seed won 6-4 6-2 as he continued the scintillating form that ended top seed Rafa Nadal’s year-long unbeaten run on clay the day before.

South African Anderson, seeded sixth, was playing in his first Masters 1000 semi-final but faded after a solid start, unable to make an impression on Thiem’s heavy baseline game.

Tennis – ATP 1000 – Madrid Open – Madrid, Spain – May 12, 2018 South Africa’s Kevin Anderson in action during his semi final match against Austria’s Dominic Thiem REUTERS/Paul Hanna

While Thiem had a 0-6 record against Anderson, the pair had never met on the Austrian’s favored clay surface and the 24-year-old dictated the longer rallies.

Slideshow (3 Images)

Thiem needed a single break of serve in the opening set and broke twice in the second to wrap up victory.

He said his victory over Nadal had been a timely boost after being thrashed by the Spaniard in Monte Carlo.

“It gave me a huge boost of confidence,” he said. “That’s for sure. But in the same time, it was a completely different matchup today.

“There was also the fact that I never beat him. It was 0-6 before today. Some things were a little bit shaky. But I was keeping my level up from yesterday, so that was a great thing.”

He will play either Alexander Zverev or Canadian Denis Shapovalov in Sunday’s final.

Reporting by Martyn Herman,; Editing by Ed Osmond



Do You Really Understand Positional Chess? – Chess.com


For those that enjoyed my previous article, Test Your Positional Chess, let’s do it again. It’s fun to follow positional concepts, and it’s also extremely instructive.

Please keep in mind that these puzzles aren’t like usual tactical puzzles. You usually won’t have to find the “one and only one” move since the position might offer several reasonable choices. So, if you think you found the right move but the software says nyet, keep trying.

Also, this isn’t for 1000-rated players or for masters; it’s for everyone. After all, when you’re playing a serious game you’ll need to deal with the game’s complexity (or lack thereof) whether you like it or not. Anyway, the real goal is to understand the position and THEN and ONLY THEN look for moves that cater to the position’s needs.

puzzle light bulb

I’ve made sure that all the puzzles have notes, so make sure you take a look at them since those are often the key to improvement.

Of course, you don’t have to agonize over the puzzles. Just click on the “?” at the left-bottom of the puzzle and the puzzle-board will open up its wonders.

One other thing: At the end of the puzzle (in my notes) I give the puzzle’s main LESSONS. So please take a look at them.

PUZZLE 1

PUZZLE 2

PUZZLE 3

PUZZLE 4

PUZZLE 5

PUZZLE 6

PUZZLE 7

1.c4 e6 2.Nc3 d5 3.d4 Be7 4.Nf3 Nf6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 O-O 7.Rc1 dxc4 8.e3 c5 9.Bxc4 cxd4 10.exd4 Nc6 11.O-O

 

PUZZLE 8