Tennis-Petra Kvitova v Danielle Collins – Tennis – Eurosport.com


Tennis-Petra Kvitova v Danielle Collins

Jan 23 (Reuters) – A look at the records of Czech Republic’s Petra Kvitova and American Danielle Collins before their semi-final match at the Australian Open on Thursday (prefix number denotes seeding):

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8-PETRA KVITOVA


Age: 28


WTA Ranking: 6


Grand Slam titles: 2 (Wimbledon 2011, 2014)


2018 Australian Open performance: First round


Best Australian Open performance: Semi-finals (2012, 2019)


It is the first time Kvitova has reached a Grand Slam semi-final since being stabbed in a home invasion in late 2016, requiring surgery to her left hand.


The Czech power-hitter has started the new year with a bang, winning the Sydney International title followed by five wins at Melbourne Park without dropping a set.


DANIELLE COLLINS


Age: 25


WTA Ranking: 35


Grand Slam titles: 0


2018 Australian Open performance: Did not play


Best Australian Open performance: Semi-finals (2019)


Collins was ranked 162nd a year ago, before she recorded wins over Madison Keys on her way to the Indian Wells quarter-finals, CoCo Vandeweghe and Venus Williams during a Miami semi-final run and Victoria Azarenka en route to another semi-final in San Jose.


The American had not recorded a match win at Grand Slams until this year but now has five of them. She knocked out three seeded players, including world number two Angelique Kerber.


HEAD-TO-HEAD (Kvitova 1 – Collins 0)


2019 Kvitova d Collins 6-7(6) 7-6(6) 6-3 (Brisbane, hard) (Reporting by Hardik Vyas in Bengaluru Editing by Christian Radnedge)



Tennis-Frances Tiafoe v Rafa Nadal – match stats – Eurosport.com


Tennis-Frances Tiafoe v Rafa Nadal - match stats

MELBOURNE, Jan 22 (Reuters) – Key statistics from Spaniard
Rafa Nadal’s 6-3 6-4 6-2 victory over American Frances Tiafoe in
the quarter-finals of the Australian Open on Tuesday (prefix
denotes seeding):

Frances Tiafoe 2-Rafa Nadal
Aces 13 11
Double faults 0 0
Break points

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MELBOURNE, Jan 22 (Reuters) – Key statistics from Spaniard
Rafa Nadal’s 6-3 6-4 6-2 victory over American Frances Tiafoe in
the quarter-finals of the Australian Open on Tuesday (prefix
denotes seeding):

Frances Tiafoe 2-Rafa Nadal
Aces 13 11
Double faults 0 0
Break points won 0/2 4/8
Net points won 4/11 9/11
Winners 24 29
Unforced errors 34 23
Total points won 61 88
Match duration: one hour and 47 minutes

(Compiled by Simon Jennings in Bengaluru
Editing by Christian Radnedge)



Parkes Tennis News – Parkes Champion-Post


Well hasn’t it been a great summer of tennis in Australia and it’s not finished yet.

While the temperatures have been scorching and not really conducive to tennis in our neck of the woods, the action all across Australia has been sizzling.

Great to see some of our younger players making breakthroughs over the past month. Names most wouldn’t have heard of including Alex Bolt, Alexei Popyrin, Kim Birrell and Astra Sharma.

These players have been toiling around on different pathways to try to make their mark on the professional tennis scene either through Challenger or Pro Tour Events(one level down), US College tennis(on scholarship and getting a degree whilst playing college tennis) or relocating to Europe to train(with 1000s of other hopefuls in Tennis Academies).

Tennis Australia deserve credit for giving wildcards to Bolt, Popyrin and Sharma to give them the opportunity for not only an amazing experience on home soil but a boost to their bank accounts to help them follow their programs for 2019.

Birrell meanwhile gained her wildcard through the Australian Wildcard process where the top 16 ranked women who would not have direct entry into the maindraw from their rankings, play off with the winner guaranteed a place in the main draw.

For their efforts Bolt, Popyrin and Birrell will all receive $155k for losing in the third round.

A final shout out to Aussie Ash Barty. Today she plays Petra Kvitova in the quarter finals and she is not only a very clever tennis player but an outstanding human.

Ash is certainly a fine role model to girls and boys in all sports on how to behave before during and after competition. GO ASH!

Sydney International

On the local front Parkes families enjoyed many different activities at the Sydney International during the first week in January. Over 120 people travelled to the event on various days.

Abbey Kennedy, Nia Boggs, Maddy and Lily McCormick all enjoyed being ballkids for the first time. They had some late nights with the weather delays and Abbey and Nia were lucky enough to enjoy their time on centre court.

Unfortunately for Maddy and Lily, their scheduled centre court times were when the matches were delayed due to the rain.

Thursday saw Anna and Lachlan Orr along with Jono and Thomas Wilkinson have an amazing time playing on centre court as part of the ANZHotShots Kinds on Court promotion.

A beaut initiative from Tennis Australia across all the States lead-in tournaments to encourage grassroots tennis.

They had a tour under Ken Rosewall Arena along the players ‘tunnel of fame’ eyeing off the trophy cabinets as well as around the complex. Through the stringing room, the gym, media area, players lounge and tournament desk the kids wandered, eyes wide open and soaking in all they could.

Their time on court was loads of fun and their families seemed even more excited about the whole experience. Friday was a real treat for Parkes families. With over 80 in the group it was a huge day which started with a Red Ball Schools competition.

Great to see teachers from Parkes Christian School and Holy Family School in Miss Barrass and Mr Berger acknowledge what an opportunity this would be for their students and followed through with an application.

Both schools were notified mid December they were successful and teams were formed. Lachlan Unger, Ruby Wilson, Jack Greenland and Clare Amery made the Christian School Team while Hayden Arndell, Sam Westcott, Tarlei Glastonbury and Charlotte Baird represented Holy Family managed by Mr McDonald.

They enjoyed matches against other schools from across NSW including another far regional team from Ungarie Public. Picton Public School was the winners on the day while the Christian School defeated Holy Family in the playoff for third and fourth.

While the school teams participated Coach Helen Magill had organised to give the parents total respite and take all the siblings for a special Tour(visiting all the places as above on Thursday) and then those siblings under 12 years were treated to a Kids on Court session playing on Ken Rosewall Arena and then finally making a guard of honour for Ash Barty as she came on for her semi final against Elise Mertens.  

An extensive album of photos and videos are on Parkes Tennis Facebook Page.

Something which can’t be measured is how much Country kids and families appreciate experiences like these days that money can’t buy. All the Parkes families were so appreciative, Tennis Australia Media team decided they would like to give them another treat and they organised for Jamie Murray and Bruno Soares(doubles champions) to meet-n-greet the group.

The kids were all so excited even though they had no idea who these men were. After the session the media team called Helen again and commented that was the best Player Meet session they had had all week and could they get some interviews with some the kids about their experience at Sydney International.

Of course they could and low and behold when the Parkes group met again and were asked who wanted to do an interview, they all put their hand up. A single file ensued in front of all the spectators watching the big screen and one by one the Tennis Australia media team interviewed everyone.

They then took some footage of them playing, went in KRA and videoed them watching a match and organised for a further Meet-n-greet with Diego Swartzmann if he won the semi final(he lost). Finally they asked could one of our players toss the coin for the Womens Doubles Final.

The task was made easy when Helen gave media a ‘lucky number’ and all the players had to choose between 1-50. Ethan Hunt guessed exactly(43) and beamed with excitement as he headed to Show Court 1 to perform his duties.

Always so nice to see our kids and their families thoroughly enjoying different experiences through tennis and when they are received so well and show their appreciation to those around them, everyone’s a winner.

Also during the week at the Sydney International there were daily morning workshops before the start of play to educate and network different sectors of tennis. Brendon and Sharon Hunt attended a Clubs Masterclass Session talking about ways Clubs.

Councils and Coaches can work better in synergy to grow the sport while Alison McCormick and Caroline Kennedy attended a Tournament Director and Officials Workshop talking through the challenges of tournament player  behaviours and working through child and volunteer protection strategies.

Local Tennis for term one

Tennis in Parkes will kick off on Monday, February 11 with ANZHotShots. HotShots tennis is Australia’s official development program for girls and boys aged four-12 years. Especially designed scaled equipment and low compression balls linked with fun and interesting sessions are the success of this program.

ANZHotShots involves half hour sessions and has been specifically designed for 4-12 year age group with a distinct emphasis on fun, fitness and skill development with their philosophy of ‘Learning through Play’ whilst providing a progressive pathway for all players.

The coach to player ratio is 1:4 so there is plenty of individual attention for EVERY child. The eight week program is $100 and includes a FREE racquet and t-shirt and a chance to be the 2019 Australian ANZHotShot of the Year and win a trip to the 2020 Australian Open.

There will also be the opportunity for private lessons. All of our coaches have successfully completed their Community Coaching Courses and are excited to take on some private lessons as well as HotShots this year. They are available throughout the week and on Saturdays.

Squads will also be a factor this year to continue to encourage a team culture and hopefully get to a few more tournaments and match play days in 2019.

All enquiries are welcome for any junior activities through Helen Magill either email- helenmagill@bigpond.com or SMS or phone- 0407 253 888.

Senior Competition

The Senior Competition will start on Tuesday, February 12. The comp is a great way to meet some people and socialise while getting some exercise over a two hour period. Teams consisting of three players playing one set of singles and two sets of doubles each week using two courts is the format.

Start time-7pm and finish approximately 9pm. Cost is $10/week. Team entries preferred but will accept individual entries and place into teams where possible. Standard is mixed with Line 1 being predominantly competent players, Line 2 casual players and Line 3 developing players or hackers.

Teams may consist of more than three players and rotate throughout the comp as they see fit with shift workers in mind. Entries to Helen by February 8.

Social Tennis

Tuesday morning ladies take to the court from 8.30am-11am. These ladies are of all standards and would love some new members to their ranks. They enjoy a social game and a chat and a little exercise as well.

Saturday evenings from 6.30pm is mixed social tennis and similar to the ladies on Tuesday mornings, this group enjoys a fun hit, a cuppa and plenty of socialising. All welcome and just turn up.

Parkes Tennis Treasurer Brendon Hunt has been developing a webpage so people can register online and keep up to date with all information.

The online regos will hopefully be ready for term two competitions while other tennis information is complete. This will enhance people’s knowledge and engagement of tennis activities and will run in addition to the very active Parkes Tennis Facebook page.

The Ace’s column will still continue every week as it’s great to have so much positive feedback from not only the community and local families, but from expats and families across the globe on how much they enjoy reading the stories on all things tennis. Media platforms have come a long way in such a short time haven’t they?



Tennis champions drawn into equal pay debate – SBS News


Tennis ace Serena Williams is calling for pay equality, urging male players to be allies to their female counterparts and help bridge the gap.

The prize money for male and female players for all four of the major tennis tournaments is the same, but that’s not the case across other Association of Tennis Professionals and Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) competitions.

Williams, who holds the record for winning the most grand slam titles in the Open Era,  said it was high time all players were paid equally.

“In order for change to really be made, men and women have to work together,” Williams said.

“They have to have the same message; they have to support each other.”

Thanks to Williams’ efforts, the topic has remained in the spotlight throughout the Australian Open, with many players quizzed on their views in their post-match press conferences.

Serena Williams first reached the number 1 ranking in 2002.

Serena Williams first reached the number 1 ranking in 2002.

Getty Images

Speaking after his fourth round defeat to Greece’s Stefanos Tsitsipas,  Roger Federer said those in the spotlight should make the most of their platform.

“Sometimes maybe the men’s game is a bit more popular, and sometimes it’s the women’s game,” he said.

“We should always help each other as players, regardless of who is more popular at the moment.”

World number two in men’s singles tennis Rafael Nadal was asked about his views after defeating Tomas Berdych to secure his place in the quarter-finals.

“I don’t care if they win more than us… if they sell more tickets than what we sell, they deserve to [earn] more than us,” he said.

“If they sell more than us, they have to win more [prize money] than us.”  

Rafael Nadal was asked about his views on pay parity.

Rafael Nadal was asked about his views on pay parity.

SBS News

The statistics

It was only in 2007 that Wimbledon finally became the last of the tennis majors to offer equal pay – and that was thanks to a determined push by Venus Williams.

“Why does Wimbledon choose to place a lesser value on my championship trophy than that of the 2005 men’s winner Roger Federer?” she remarked in 2006.

Years on, the US Open, the Australian Open, the Roland Garros and Wimbledon now offer the same prize money for male and female winners.

But in some tournaments, the men’s event winners receive more than double the female players.

At the Rogers Cup women’s event in Montreal, Simona Halep received a cheque for around half a million US dollars.

Nadal received more than US $1 million.

In Cincinnati, the men’s prize money is more than double the women’s prize money.

In 2018, there were no women ranked among Forbes’s global listing of the highest paid athletes – Serena Williams did not play a WTA event due to her pregnancy, and Maria Sharapova was in the midst of a suspension.

Williams is expected to return to the list this year, but with no other female sports stars with a similar profile or exposure, it’s likely that yet again, she will be the only woman on the list, as she was in 2017.

Viewership trends

The argument made by Federer that ticket sales and viewership can change from year to year as a reason to support equality in the sport is backed up by statistics.

In tennis, there are often specific players – and rivalries – that draw large audiences in the arena and on screen.

After his defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas, Roger Federer said popularity can fluctuate.

After his defeat to Stefanos Tsitsipas, Roger Federer said popularity can fluctuate.

AP

US sports broadcaster ESPN revealed last year year, television ratings for the women’s final at Wimbledon went up, but decreased for the men’s final.

Similarly, Williams’ loss to Naomi Osaka in the US Open finals last year was the most watched game in ESPN’s coverage of the whole tournament – it drew more than three million viewers, while the men’s final drew averaged around 2 million.

In many tournaments, such as the US Open, it is not uncommon for the women’s rounds to sell out before the men’s – a testament to the popularity of certain players, including Williams.  

Andy Murray commended as an ally

When Andy Murray announced his plans to hang up his racquet in 2019, many players took the opportunity to thank him for his efforts in calling out sexism, and campaigning for equality across his career.

Sharapova told reporters on Monday, after her victory against Harriet Dart, that while there was not always widespread support for equality from most male players, Murray has been an exception.

Andy Murray has been commended as an ally for female players.

Andy Murray has been commended as an ally for female players.

AAP Image/Corinne Dubreuil/ABACAPRESS.COM

“Sitting at a press conference in Wimbledon five, seven years ago, there was not a lot of warmth coming from that side or that perspective,” she said on Monday.

“There are definitely a few exceptions in the game, and I’m sure that [Murray’s] been one of them.”

Murray has been praised by many female players as a champion on and off the court, and has challenged sexism over the years by highlighting the achievements of female players.

“I do not think there is a woman player who is not totally supportive of Andy Murray,” Serena Williams said.

“He has spoken up for women’s rights… especially in tennis… we love Andy Murray.”



Tennis Australian Open Ash Barty beats Maria Sharapova – ESPN


MELBOURNE, Australia — Australia’s Ash Barty has fought back from a set down against Maria Sharapova to secure her passage into a maiden Grand Slam quarterfinal.

The 22-year-old Australian gave up a tight first set before rallying and dominating the former World No. 1 in the second and early parts of the third, eventually advancing 4-6, 6-1, 6-4.

Barty took advantage of an off day from Sharapova on serve; the Russian double-faulted on 10 occasions throughout the match, gifting the No. 15 seed free points at crucial stages.

It wasn’t all smooth sailing for Barty, who, despite battling hard throughout the first set, gave up the first break point opportunity in the ninth game which the No. 30 Sharapova gladly took on her way to a 6-4 lead.

However the second set was played completely on the Australian’s terms. After exchanging holds early, Barty took advantage of a break point opportunity to lead 3-1, and after Sharapova started to show frustration not long after, Barty quickly consolidated and ran away with the set, 6-1.

Following the second set, Sharapova ran into the locker room for a seven-minute bathroom break, but came out just as rattled as in the second.

In her first service game of the third, Sharapova double-faulted to gift Barty three break points. The young Australian only needed one, and then breezed through her first service game for a 2-0 lead in the decider.

There were some nervous moments from the young Australian in the closing stages; after racing to a 4-1 lead, Sharapova broke back and faced two further break opportunities which would have levelled the match, but Barty’s strong service game helped to dig her out of the hole.

Barty will face No. 8 seed Petra Kvitova — who defeated Barty in the final of the Sydney International — in the quarterfinals, after the two-time Wimbledon-winning Czech breezed past young American Amanda Anisimova in straight sets.



Paul Lewis: Pay parity for women should be first priority in tennis tug-of-war – New Zealand Herald


COMMENT

When a tennis ace who was the first to earn over US$100m starts talking about more money for tennis players, you kind of turn off.

Novak Djokovic, and those backing him in an apparent power play in the Association of Tennis Professionals management ranks, has made it clear they are not talking about trousering more money themselves. That’d be a bit like Amazon’s Jeff Bezos (net worth, before divorce, US$125 billion) agitating for a salary rise.

No, they are intent on raising the stake money for tennis’ strugglers – essentially anyone ranked outside the top 200 in the world and maybe quite a few in the 100-200 bracket.

Djokovic, president of the ATP players’ council, has trumpeted this stuff at the Australian Open before. This time, the difference is that the players could be making a move on the ATP executive.

There are six members of the ATP board who will soon vote on renewing the contract of ATP chief executive Chris Kermode – three player representatives (Djokovic, Justin Gimelstob and David Egdes) and three tournament representatives. Kermode needs four votes and Djokovic, according to some unconfirmed reports, will vote against him, leading to thoughts of a player-elected CEO.

That’s when players can make a pitch for more funds disseminated from tournaments to lower-ranked individuals struggling to make money and to stay on the tour.

[Read more: ‘Scared kids’: Novak Djokovic-led war brewing at Australian Open]

They have a case. It’s well known that many would-be pros can’t make a go of it, struggling to cover their costs – more of that later. The ATP has successfully increased prize money on offer (men’s money has doubled in the five years to 2018) but players say the tournaments are pocketing higher revenues themselves, rather than increasing the amounts paid to also-rans.

Men's ATP World Tour finalists in 2015. Photo / Getty
Men’s ATP World Tour finalists in 2015. Photo / Getty

But hang on just a racquet-throwing moment. There are inequities in tennis arguably more urgent than shoring up lesser-ranked males. And who said anything about the game owing you a living?

This is professional sport. It’s supposed to be hard. It isn’t “riches for everyone”. No one guarantees we ordinary Joes a living; if we don’t produce in our line of work, then we don’t share in the proceeds either.

Professional sport isn’t a right, it’s a privilege. To make it, you have to attain a certain level – and that is part of the fascination of the sport…any sport. For every pro rugby player getting to first-class and international standard, there are multitudes who don’t. Same with F1, football, cycling, boxing, basketball, athletics and even golf – one of the richest sports, wistfully viewed by tennis pros, supposedly as a valid comparison with their “meagre” earnings.

It’s a crock – golf in Europe and the US (and backed by a huge and enthusiastic Asian audience) is watched by large global audiences every week, compared to tennis whose TV audience grows to those heights only four times a year at the Grand Slams.

If we’re talking inequity, women achieved pay parity in slam tournaments – but the stark truth is that they earn way less than men in all others.

Last year, The Guardian published data showing that 71 per cent of the world’s top 100 men earned more prize money than the top 100 women.

Don’t give me that men-play-five-sets, women play three BS. Outside the slams, the males play best of three too.

Serena Williams. Photo / AP
Serena Williams. Photo / AP

Djokovic has previously said men deserve to be paid more because they attract bigger audiences. That’s mostly true – though there have been plenty of examples of women’s finals in slam tournaments attracting more viewers than the men’s, like when Serena Williams is in the US Open final.

[Read more: Stick to sports – Serena Williams, and the politicisation of sport]

The pay difference doesn’t include endorsements and some women, like Williams and clothes horses like Maria Sharapova and Eugenie Bouchard, do well in that field.

But the point remains: most women earn less than men in tennis. In these days of gender awareness, maybe balancing those books is the tournaments’ first priority in sharing wealth, not just kissing the rings of the blokes. Andy Murray and Roger Federer have pretty much been lone voices calling for more gender equity.

Having said all that, members of both sexes who struggle to break into the top bracket have it tough.

Last year, The Australian newspaper maintained the average income of a male pro was US$32,600, after dividing global prize money by the total number of male players. Problem was, the average cost of travelling on tour, eating and sleeping was US$38,800 – and that before hiring a coach (minimum US$1000 a week).

Unlike team sports, tennis players have to pay their own flights, airport transfers, food, laundry, and accommodation. That’s before paying for the expenses of a coach and/or physio. Most knowledgeable observers say to make decent money you need to be inside the top 200 – and probably within the top 100.

An International Tennis Federation (ITF) study in 2013 found the break-even point (where average costs met earnings) was 336 for men and 253 for women. Add in coaching costs and the break-even point shrunk to about 150.

But those who have been going to Auckland’s ASB Classic for years remember a young Federer and a young Rafael Nadal playing here well outside the top 150, unknown youngsters looking to build their careers.

They did that – and no one promised them a living.